Pier Repair Carrollton TX

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Carrollton House Leveling Services Foundation Repair Proudly Servicing Dallas County

Carrollton House Leveling Services Foundation Repair is your number one foundation repair Directory and foundation repair contractor network in the Carrollton area. Experts efficiently handle all types of foundation issues so that you can return to normal life activities as quickly as possible. No foundations are out of our reach. Advanced technology is used creating solutions to solve every unwanted foundation problem you may have.

Carrollton House Leveling Services Foundation Repair

will develop a customized service plan to contain and control foundations in your home. Below lists some services and areas of expertise:

  • Concrete Lifting and Leveling
  • Settlement Sinking
  • Sagging Crawl Space
  • Floor Cracks
  • Uneven Floors
  • Sticking Windows and Doors
  • Tilting Chimneys
  • Foundation Pier Systems
  • Helical Deck Piers
  • Crawl Space Support Posts

Carrollton House Leveling Services’s foundation service network helps you find professionals located in Carrollton, TX. It has been family owned and operated for years where it has grown into a diverse selection of Foundation Repair experts. Pros will provide complete foundation repair service no matter how complex.


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Carrollton Foundation Repair

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Foundation Repair
Phone: 1-817-222-9253
2561 Church Street South, Carrollton, TX 75006

Available services for Foundation Repair in Carrollton TX

Carrollton House Leveling Services’s Foundation Repair Service specializes is a providing all foundation care needs. You will be treated like family, so you can take pride in striving to get the best service imaginable at a fair price.

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Pier

A pier is a raised structure in a body of water, typically supported by well-spaced piles or pillars. Bridges, buildings, and walkways may all be supported by piers. Their open structure allows tides and currents to flow relatively unhindered, whereas the more solid foundations of a quay or the closely spaced piles of a wharf can act as a breakwater, and are consequently more liable to silting. Piers can range in size and complexity from a simple lightweight wooden structure to major structures extended over 1600 metres. In American English, a pier may be synonymous with a dock.

Piers have been built for several purposes, and because these different purposes have distinct regional variances, the term pier tends to have different nuances of meaning in different parts of the world. Thus in North America and Australia, where many ports were, until recently, built on the multiple pier model, the term tends to imply a current or former cargo-handling facility. In Europe in contrast, where ports more often use basins and river-side quays than piers, the term is principally associated with the image of a Victorian cast iron pleasure pier. However, the earliest piers pre-date the Victorian age.

Piers can be categorized into different groupings according to the principal purpose.[1] However, there is considerable overlap between these categories. For example, pleasure piers often also allow for the docking of pleasure steamers and other similar craft, while working piers have often been converted to leisure use after being rendered obsolete by advanced developments in cargo-handling technology. Many piers are floating piers, to ensure that the piers raise and lower with the tide along with the boats tied to them. This prevents a situation where lines become overly taut or loose by rising or lowering tides. An overly taut or loose tie-line can damage boats by pulling them out of the water or allowing them so much leeway that they bang forcefully against the sides of the pier.

Working piers were built for the handling of passengers and cargo onto and off ships or (as at Wigan Pier) canal boats. Working piers themselves fall into two different groups. Longer individual piers are often found at ports with large tidal ranges, with the pier stretching far enough off shore to reach deep water at low tide. Such piers provided an economical alternative to impounded docks where cargo volumes were low, or where specialist bulk cargo was handled, such as at coal piers. The other form of working pier, often called the finger pier, was built at ports with smaller tidal ranges. Here the principal advantage was to give a greater available quay length for ships to berth against compared to a linear littoral quayside, and such piers are usually much shorter. Typically each pier would carry a single transit shed the length of the pier, with ships berthing bow or stern in to the shore. Some major ports consisted of large numbers of such piers lining the foreshore, classic examples being the Hudson River frontage of New York, or the Embarcadero in San Francisco.

The advent of container shipping, with its need for large container handling spaces adjacent to the shipping berths, has made working piers obsolete for the handling of general cargo, although some still survive for the handling of passenger ships or bulk cargos. One example, is in use in Progreso, Yucatán, where a pier extends more than 4 miles into the Gulf of Mexico, making it the longest pier in the world. The Progreso Pier supplies much of the peninsula with transportation for the fishing and cargo industries and serves as a port for large cruise ships in the area. Many other working piers have been demolished, or remain derelict, but some have been recycled as pleasure piers. The best known example of this is Pier 39 in San Francisco.

Pleasure piers were first built in Britain during the early 19th century.[2] The earliest structures were Ryde Pier, built in 1813/4, Trinity Chain Pier near Leith, built in 1821, and Brighton Chain Pier, built in 1823.[2] Only the oldest of these piers still remains. At that time the introduction of the railways for the first time permitted mass tourism to dedicated seaside resorts. The large tidal ranges at many such resorts meant that for much of the day, the sea was not visible from dry land. The pleasure pier was the resorts' answer, permitting holidaymakers to promenade over and alongside the sea at all times.[3]The world's longest pleasure pier is at Southend-on-sea, Essex, and extends 1.3 miles (2.1 km) into the Thames estuary.[2] With a length of 2,745 feet (836.68 m), the longest pier on the West Coast of the US is the Santa Cruz Wharf.[4]

Providing a walkway out to sea, pleasure piers often include amusements and theatres as part of the attraction.[3] Such a pier may be open air, closed, or partly open, partly closed. Sometimes a pier has two decks. Galveston Island Historic Pleasure Pier in Galveston, Texas has 1 roller coaster, 15 rides, carnival games and souvenir shops.[5]

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